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RESEARCH

Professor Bocko's research interests fall into three areas:

        Sensors
        Music Processing
        Superconductivity

Sensors

Professor Bocko's work on sensors extends back to his graduate student days, when he first worked on gravitational wave detectors. He studied the quantum limits of resonant mass gravitational wave antennae and quantum nondemolition measurement techniques; and along the way, developed transducers that could measure displacements of macroscopic resonant bar gravitational wave detectors to a precision of about 1/1000th of a proton diameter. This work, involving superconductivity, radio frequency electronics, sensor design, and signal processing set the stage for most of his future research.

His research on sensors has taken a more practical turn since his early days. He developed a highly sensitive capacitive accelerometer, which is still a commercial product available from a major sensor manufacturer. Bocko's research group was also the first to propose using electron tunneling for displacement sensors, and the group explored the quantum limits of tunneling sensors.

More recently, Professor Bocko has worked in the area of CMOS circuits for low-power vibration and acceleration sensors and all digital CMOS image sensors with built-in image compression. In fact, he started a company to develop the latter.

Professor Bocko is also the Technology Director of the University's Center for Future Health, which explores how ubiquitous sensing, communication, and computing technologies may be used to help individuals better manage their health on an everyday basis.

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Music Processing

Professor Bocko's first love is music, and he has combined this with his research by co-founding the Music Research Laboratory, which conducts studies in the area of science and technology with music. The group's projects range from creating machines that listen (automated transcription), to the physics of wind instruments and model based music synthesis and musical sound representations. They also have an active project on audio watermarking and steganography and their use for embedding meta-data in compressed and uncompressed sound formats. Bocko plays the bassoon and string bass.

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Superconductivity

A good part of Professor Bocko's research has focused on exploiting superconductivity in a variety of electronic applications, including high-frequency digital signal processing circuits and analog circuits for the low-noise detection of weak electromagnetic and mechanical signals. His group developed Josephson junction-based rapid single-flux quantum digital signal processing circuits capable of clock rates above 20 GHz. The group demonstrated basic DSP elements at clock speeds up to 50 GHz. In 1996, Professor Bocko's group was the first to propose building a quantum computer using superconducting Josephson junction circuits; and they worked for many years on quantum coherence in Josephson junction circuits and using RSFQ superconducting electronics to control Josephson junction quantum bits (qubits). Currently, Professor Bocko's interest in this area is focused on nondestructive readout techniques for superconducting and electromechanical qubits.

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